trixiedelight:

Clue (1985)

(via ratsoff)


If you were a computer-loving male child who took a lot of shit from your peers, I suspect you heard something similar from the adults in your life. Maybe it was “Sure, things are bad now, but when you’re a little bit older, women will LOVE guys like you!” Or maybe it was “That kid who makes fun of you now will be working at a gas station when you run a big fancy computer company and marry a supermodel!” If you were once young, nerdy and male, it is not unlikely that your future sense of self-worth was funded with a non-consensual IOU from the world’s women. It’s taken me a long time, but at this point I genuinely believe that much of this “GEEKS SHALL INHERIT THE EARTH” rhetoric is little more than patriarchy’s bespectacled wingman. It excuses the pain that systems of power exert on children by promising little boys future dominion over little girls. It is deeply and massively fucked.

What (Else) Can Men Do? Grow The Fuck Up. — Medium (via imamandanelson)

oh my god this…

(via beingruth)

Are computer-loving female children fed these same lines? Are they told “SOME DAY YOU WILL HAVE ALL THE MONEY AND POWERS AND MEN WILL FLOCK TO YOU LIKE AUTONOMY-DEPRIVED MAN-ZOMBIES?” If you insist that the presence of enough computers magically transforms the world into a meritocracy, you might want to think about that one for a second.

(via cleolinda)

(via theashleyclements)


closetsare4clothes:

majestikmajesty:

coffee-and-yoga:

donotcryout:

The Sexy Lie, Caroline Heldman at TEDxYouth@SanDiego

Every single word of this.

The body monitoring though.

jesus h christ hallelujah preach 

My brilliant professor- Caroline Heldman- love her! 

(via theashleyclements)


theoneandonlyannabanana:

Give me all of them pls

(via thecurvaceousconfidence)


inmyopinion:

A few weeks ago I decided I wanted some light summer reading. So I bought the latest Jennifer Weiner, David Baldacci, and Gillian Flynn novels. And disliked each one more than the last.
So, when M (I can randomly introduce new characters into my blog, right?) suggested that I read Michael Crichton’s 1988 non-fiction memoir-ish book, Travels, I agreed. Actually, M didn’t suggest it so much as take my iPad, download the book, and read me the preface before turning it over. So it seemed like a good idea to read it.
As it turns out, I loved this book. There’s some strange stuff—psychics and exorcisms, auras and mysticism. There are also some amazing descriptions of place and subsequent experience—Mt. Kilimanjaro, New Guinea, Jamaica, Shangri-La, London. But ultimately it doesn’t matter if Crichton is writing about one of his Harvard med school classes or an afternoon tracking gorillas or a week meditating with a cactus, it’s his talented storytelling that makes this worth reading—that, and the fact that he has SO many stories to tell. 
To me, the best writers are those who live great stories. Doing this requires an insatiable curiosity. That’s what made this book a new favorite for me—meeting a writer with an almost obsessive need to experience things in order to gain perspective and ultimately be more self aware.
So, I’m like 26 years late to the game on this one, but if you haven’t read this, add it to your list.

This is one of my favorite books, and I have a hard time convincing anyone to read it.

inmyopinion:

A few weeks ago I decided I wanted some light summer reading. So I bought the latest Jennifer Weiner, David Baldacci, and Gillian Flynn novels. And disliked each one more than the last.

So, when M (I can randomly introduce new characters into my blog, right?) suggested that I read Michael Crichton’s 1988 non-fiction memoir-ish book, Travels, I agreed. Actually, M didn’t suggest it so much as take my iPad, download the book, and read me the preface before turning it over. So it seemed like a good idea to read it.

As it turns out, I loved this book. There’s some strange stuff—psychics and exorcisms, auras and mysticism. There are also some amazing descriptions of place and subsequent experience—Mt. Kilimanjaro, New Guinea, Jamaica, Shangri-La, London. But ultimately it doesn’t matter if Crichton is writing about one of his Harvard med school classes or an afternoon tracking gorillas or a week meditating with a cactus, it’s his talented storytelling that makes this worth reading—that, and the fact that he has SO many stories to tell. 

To me, the best writers are those who live great stories. Doing this requires an insatiable curiosity. That’s what made this book a new favorite for me—meeting a writer with an almost obsessive need to experience things in order to gain perspective and ultimately be more self aware.

So, I’m like 26 years late to the game on this one, but if you haven’t read this, add it to your list.

This is one of my favorite books, and I have a hard time convincing anyone to read it.


flourish:

justsomecrazydreamer:

Glamour finally speaking my language

Good advice!

flourish:

justsomecrazydreamer:

Glamour finally speaking my language

Good advice!

(via nonnonmodernist)


smaugchiefestofcalamities:

a-cumberbatch-of-cookies:

anthropomorphicimpala:

PRAISE HEAVEN FOR YOU BLESS YOUR BEAUTIFUL SOULD YOU ARE THE BEST PERSON ON EARTH THANK

CAS AND JACK OH MY GOD YES

Did somebody say Cas and Jack?

(via patheticperipatetic)


Round here we’re carving out our names

Round here we all look the same

Round here we talk just like lions

But we sacrifice like lambs


I know this look, and you are in trouble.

(via daenerysknope)